1088 – Freedom of Speech – a rare commodity in Vietnam

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commemorate the liberation of Saigon, vietnam veteran news, mack payne

A file photo by VnExpress shows a parade to commemorate the liberation of Saigon and the end of Vietnam War in Ho Chi Minh City.

In episode 1088 of the Vietnam Veteran News Podcast the age old question asked by legendary singer Country Joe McDonald of the group Country Joe and the Fish in their hit song I Think I’m Fixin to Die. The question asked in the song was “what are we fighting for?” It has been addressed in several previous episodes of this podcast. In this episode freedom of speech will we the reason examined.

Recently five Vietnamese citizens in An Giang Province got in trouble with the law.  The Province is way down south in Vietnam about eighty miles west of Saigon and a few miles north of Can Tho where satisfaction with the government is not as strong as it is in the northern environs of the country. It seems they had the audacity to display flags of the old South Vietnamese regime. Now they are facing up to five years in prison followed by two years of house arrest.

There was a story in The Vietnam Express International title: 5 Vietnamese sentenced to 3-5 years in jail for flying flags of old Saigon regime. It described the crimes committed by these young men as propaganda against the State. The story pointed out the penalty for what they did is up to twenty years in prison. In addition to the five men in the story who are facing prison sentences several other high profile cases were listed where Vietnamese citizens are serving twenty years for similar offenses.

This story exemplifies one of the things we were fighting for in that War. It is important to always remember how fortunate we are here in America to be able to enjoy the freedom of speech.

Listen to episode 1088 of the podcast for the full story of what happens to the citizens of Vietnam who attempt to exercise the basic human right of free speech.


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